Short-term effects of orthognathic surgery on somatosensory function and recovery pattern in the early postoperative period

Ko Dezawa, Noboru Noma, Kosuke Watanabe, Yuka Sato, Ryutaro Kohashi, Morio Tonogi, Gary Heir, Eli Eliav, Yoshiki Imamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the short-term surgical effects of orthognathic surgery on somatosensory function. Observations were made over a short period: 3 months postoperatively. In total, 14 patients and 32 healthy controls participated. Among the 14 patients, one underwent bilateral sagittal split osteotomy alone and 13 underwent bilateral sagittal split osteotomy in combination with a Le Fort I osteotomy. A modified quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol (the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain, DFNS) was used to evaluate clinically the skin of the chin for sensory disturbances before surgery and at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. A visual analog scale and the Japanese Version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire were completed by all participants. Both sides of the mandible showed postoperative functional loss in cold detection threshold, warmth detection threshold, thermal sensory limen, and mechanical detection threshold. All function gradually recovered to baseline conditions at 3 months postoperatively. Cold detection threshold, warmth detection threshold, thermal sensory limen, and mechanical detection threshold appeared to be useful QST parameters for evaluating neurosensory disturbances during the early postoperative period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-184
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Oral Science
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

Keywords

  • Bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy
  • Orthognathic surgery
  • Quantitative sensory testing
  • The German research network on neuropathic pain

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