Distinct interacting core taxa in co-occurrence networks enable discrimination of polymicrobial oral diseases with similar symptoms

Takahiko Shiba, Takayasu Watanabe, Hirokazu Kachi, Tatsuro Koyanagi, Noriko Maruyama, Kazunori Murase, Yasuo Takeuchi, Fumito Maruyama, Yuichi Izumi, Ichiro Nakagawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polymicrobial diseases, which can be life threatening, are caused by the presence and interactions of multiple microbes. Peri-implantitis and periodontitis are representative polymicrobial diseases that show similar clinical symptoms. To establish a means of differentiating between them, we compared microbial species and functional genes in situ by performing metatranscriptomic analyses of peri-implantitis and periodontitis samples obtained from the same subjects (n = 12 each). Although the two diseases differed in terms of 16S rRNA-based taxonomic profiles, they showed similarities with respect to functional genes and taxonomic and virulence factor mRNA profiles. The latter-defined as microbial virulence types-differed from those of healthy periodontal sites. We also showed that networks based on co-occurrence relationships of taxonomic mRNA abundance (co-occurrence networks) were dissimilar between the two diseases. Remarkably, these networks consisted mainly of taxa with a high relative mRNA-to-rRNA ratio, with some showing significant co-occurrence defined as interacting core taxa, highlighting differences between the two groups. Thus, peri-implantitis and periodontitis have shared as well as distinct microbiological characteristics. Our findings provide insight into microbial interactions in polymicrobial diseases with unknown etiologies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number30997
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Aug 2016
Externally publishedYes

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