Current status of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization⇓time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in clinical diagnostic microbiology

Sachio Tsuchida, Hiroshi Umemura, Tomohiro Nakayama

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mass spectrometry (MS), a core technology for proteomics and metabolomics, is currently being developed for clinical applications. The identification of microorganisms in clinical samples using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a representative MS-based proteomics application that is relevant to daily clinical practice. This technology has the advantages of convenience, speed, and accuracy when compared with conventional biochemical methods. MALDI-TOF MS can shorten the time used for microbial identification by about 1 day in routine workflows. Sample preparation from microbial colonies has been improved, increasing the accuracy and speed of identification. MALDI-TOF MS is also used for testing blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine, because it can directly identify the microorganisms in these liquid samples without prior culture or subculture. Thus, MALDI-TOF MS has the potential to improve patient prognosis and decrease the length of hospitalization and is therefore currently considered an essential tool in clinical microbiology. Furthermore, MALDI-TOF MS is currently being combined with other technologies, such as flow cytometry, to expand the scope of clinical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4775
JournalMolecules
Volume25
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Bacterial identification
  • Blood culture
  • Clinical proteomics
  • Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)
  • Sample preparation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Current status of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization⇓time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in clinical diagnostic microbiology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this