Activated carbon derived from Japanese distilled liquor waste: Application as the electrode active material of electric double-layer capacitors

Takuya Eguchi, Daisuke Tashima, Masumi Fukuma, Seiji Kumagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Shochu is a major distilled liquor in Japan, and significant shochu waste (approximately one million metric tons) is discharged every year. Wheat shochu waste was precarbonized at 600 or 700 °C and then processed by KOH chemical activation, producing shochu waste-derived activated carbon (SWAC). The material properties and electrochemical performance of SWAC were investigated to verify its potential use as the electrode active material of electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), in comparison with two types of commercially available benchmark activated carbons. The precarbonization temperature had a significant influence on not only the development of pores but also the energy and power densities of the SWACs. Among all the samples, the SWAC precarbonized at 700 °C, with a specific surface area of 2434 m2 g−1, exhibited the highest gravimetric specific capacitance of 152 F g−1 and the highest gravimetric energy density of 44 Wh kg−1. The SWAC precarbonized at 600 °C achieved the highest volumetric specific capacitance of 75 F cm−3 and a volumetric energy density of 18 Wh L−1 but displayed low power performance. The performance of EDLC electrodes using this distilled liquor-originated biowaste was highly promising.

Original languageEnglish
Article number120822
JournalJournal of Cleaner Production
Volume259
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jun 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Activated carbon
  • Biowaste
  • Electric double-layer capacitor
  • Liquor waste
  • Precarbonization
  • Supercapacitor

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